Touch Language

Touch Language

All the different ways.

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Thesis Exhibition Proposal

 

Kaufmann Dorsky2 Kaufmann Dorsky3 KaufmannDorsky1

I propose to build a pyramid shaped monolith which holds up the one almighty communicative device. The monolith is 2′ square at the base and 1′ square at the top. It is 3.5′ tall. The object which is held above the monolith by a small pole is 2.5 x 5 x .5 inches. This object will have a surface which one could mark with water on the tip of a finger. There will be a pool of water set into the top of the monolith, below the smaller object. This whole piece stands alone on the floor and it is accompanied by a series of tablet forms installed on four 2′ by 4′ tables which form a square around the perimeter. The whole space is roughly 15′ square.

The porcelain tablets on the tables each have a singular permanent calligraphic mark which is created via my touchscreen calligraphy process. These tablets are propped on stands at an angle facing the pyramid. Each of the individual marks on the tablets are used in pattern and repetition to create a kind of “text” which is etched into the surface of the stony white ceramic monolith. At the bottom of this pyramid form, the etched marks are small, overlapping, and jumbled. As the eye moves upward, the marks become increasingly larger, and separate from one another until individual marks are recognizable at fingertip scale.

Thesis Statement and Outline

This is boiled down from the post below. Feedback welcome.

Thesis Abstract

Touch screen communicative electronics demand a kind of attention which has never before been enacted by an object. Using haptic and visual interstimuli, these devices engage their users in physiological transactions which are markedly different from the interactions spurred by past tools of information storage and transfer. Past in this instance includes: stone and clay tablets, scrolls, codices, books (hand and machine made), messengers, signal fires, letters, telegrams, telephones, and laptop/desktop computers. Despite the seemingly new mode of interactivity between humans and their tools, there are striking similarities to the old ways, ways which embody the essence of what it is to be human.

This is not the first time that there has been a significant shift in the way that information moves and translates among its authors. The advent of writing, when humans began to organize thought visually and linearly as opposed to aurally and without concrete reference to time, changed not only the way information travelled, but it also set roots for visual systems both within and without informational content.  Calligraphy was once the foundation for this structure, but efficiency drove the path to typography, valuing order above all else, and leaving in its wake a memory of the preserved human presence in liquid moments.

Those moments are not gone. The technology of information has come full circle back to drawing in the sand. In 1936, H.G. Wells predicted the existence of a “world brain.” We have it now. It rests in our palms with a slick surface as the entry point to an increasingly pressurized flow of knowledge. Marks made by hand-tool interaction are still the driver of information transfer, although the marks themselves are now spared from any visual language. The marks then become an indirect messenger of sorts, between human and tool rather than following a direct human to human path. This is a new pattern and it represents a powerful shift for us as gatherers of information.

If the written word is so influential in our thinking and seeing patterns, what might we be in for now that a flux of words and images flash through our eyes as they simultaneously slide deftly under our fingertips?

Thesis Outline

1. History of visual information. Showing the ways that written language shaped visual thinking.

A. Calligraphy. Showing the ceremonial and celebratory nature of information preservation through human marks. Also showing the precedent for hand-tool interaction.

B. Typography. Showing beauty in order, organization, and efficiency with reference to information.

2. Exponential growth of information and the need for editing. Showing the problems of the permanent record and how those problems are addressed by a selection process.

A. The nature of translations.

B. The nature of indexing.

3. Screens and Interaction. Showing a new paradigm of the way information authors and consumers relate to the tools which foster communicative processes. Also, posing questions about how this paradigm may shape visual and tactile thinking.

4. Conclusion. Isn’t finger painting great?

 

 

Thoughts

In my artist statement (see “About” section), I state that my work grows from thoughts and observations, etc., etc. Here are some of those thoughts and observations:

– Handheld communicative electronics demand attention from their users in a way previously unseen in an object. Using haptic and visual interstimuli, these devices engage their users physiologically on a deeper level than past forms of communication tools. Past in this instance includes: stone and clay tablets, scrolls, codices, books (hand and machine made), messengers, signal fires, letters, telegrams, telephones, and laptop/desktop computers.

-The information that carries through handheld electronic objects is fluid and nonstatic. This condition along with the sensory conditions described above represent a significant shift in the way that the users of these machines relate both visually and physically to their information.

-The paradigm shift in the way information moves is akin to the visual shift linked with the advent of writing, when humans began to organize thought visually and linearly as opposed to aurally and without concrete reference to time. When this shift occurred, there were enormous changes that followed in the way that humans organized thought. What might we be in for now?

– In writing’s history, we see two new art forms emerge: calligraphy and typography. Each have profound impact on visual thinking.

-In calligraphy, liquid media are celebrated for the way they exemplify the human tendency to mark and preserve the present moment. Also evident is the beauty in a measure of control over this liquid.

-In typography, the virtues are reversed: beauty in precision control is the starting point, and typographers challenge themselves to preserve a measure of spontaneity.

-At the root of all of these historical and present day means of communicating is one essential element: a hand-tool interaction which makes a mark. Despite the shift in informational movement, this core action still occurs, but it is less and less a part of the visual language.

Rectangles

 

Rectangles

These represent exact dimensions of common phone and tablet sizes. As you can see, there are three zones of commonality: one for phones, one for small tablets, and one for large tablets. For the current round of tools that I’m working on, I’ve found the average size and shape for each zone.